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The power of fantasy and imagination in children

The power of fantasy and imagination in children


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Surely many parents have ever wondered if it is normal for the child to speak alone, imagine characters, create stories, situations, and interact and play with them. Well, I confess that I have also worried at times, although for no reason. The imagination as well as the fantasy of children are absolutely normal. What kinds of fantasies does your child create? Does your child have any imaginary friends?

The child uses his imagination to understand, interpret and recreate the world around him. His fantasy helps him understand certain rules and limits, to put himself in the place of the other, and to create an intimate environment, full of magic, in which only he has access. The imagination would be something like a great mirror of the reality in which the child lives. It is the basis of your creativity, and therefore it must be free and respected.

When the child imagines and fantasizes, he also has fun and, at the same time, expresses his own problems and concerns, in a world where the rules and decisions belong only to him. The child controls everything and everyone. He makes up friends, brothers, imaginary people who are usually the same age as him. Mix the dream with reality.

It is also normal for the child to try to hide his imaginary world from his parents. This is his way of protecting his fantasy and keeping it from any possible criticism. The child's imaginary world can only be a cause for concern if it continues to persist throughout his development or if it prevents the child from being aware of the reality in which he lives.

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Video: Building Imagination in Children (June 2022).